Handloom cotton notecards

Notecards and envelopes with handloom cotton textile covers and prints in vegetable dye. Available at stores.

Handmade journals

For the love of writing. Fresh new colours in our banana fiber journals. Hand stitched using 100% recycled paper sourced from rural recycling units. The joy of writing on textured and uneven paper is an experience in itself, come try our papers at our store in Kala Ghoda and experience its versatility.

Don’t miss the little birdie in the corner of the picture!

Vintage newspaper

New soft-bound journals complement our existing range of vintage newspaper stationery. Newspapers have always been an inspiration for us. We will keep looking for innovative ways to use them in our pieces of art. 
This particular lot of newspapers date back to the 1970’s, it was picked-up at an auction by an old library that maintained volumes of newspapers bound together in their entirety. Our craftsmen strategically cut and tear relevant pieces of the newspaper so that the stationery looks aesthetically beautiful. If you look carefully, you can see that all our pencils have text flowing in one direction. Our notecards have torn edges with bamboo woven across the newsprint. Come visit us at Kala Ghoda and take home a story.

Sketch books



Leather bound sketch books for the artist in you. Papers are textured and handmade from 100% recycled white cotton. The papers are free of acid, lignin and chlorine/bleach. All sheets have hand-torn edges. Available in two sizes. Launching soon from our upcoming store at Kala Ghoda, Mumbai. 

15 year waste project

For the last 15 years we collected our left-over and waste paper. Now these are sets of complimentary notecards and envelopes that we distribute with purchases from our stores. When you write on these note cards, do remember their journey across the years when they were a part of pathbreaking design and trend-setting paper products. 

Paper weaving

Paper weaving by Anand Prakash

This is vintage Anand Prakash , Strips of paper woven on a handmade paper card. This looks easy but it isn’t because the paper is very delicate as compared to cane and it becomes difficult to push the strips in. The pattern requires some calculation as one has to know when to go over or below.

The story of this pattern is interesting, Santosh was the craftsman who came up with this idea as he came from a family of chair-weavers and it came naturally to him. Since inception, I have learnt a lot from a wide variety of people which includes children. The best ideas have come from the most unexpected of sources.